What is Ferrimagnetic Material – Ferrimagnetism – Definition

A ferrimagnetic material is one that has populations of atoms with opposing magnetic moments. Ferrites (widely used in household products such as refrigerator magnets) are usually ferrimagnetic ceramic compounds derived from iron oxides.

Magnetic property refers to the response of a material to an applied magnetic field. The macroscopic magnetic properties of a material are a consequence of interactions between an external magnetic field and the magnetic dipole moments of the constituent atoms. Different materials react to the application of magnetic field differently. The most familiar effects occur in ferromagnetic materials, which are strongly attracted by magnetic fields and can be magnetized to become permanent magnets, producing magnetic fields themselves. Only a few substances are ferromagnetic. The most common ones are iron, cobalt and nickel and their alloys.

Ferrimagnetic Material – Ferrimagnetism

The macroscopic magnetic characteristics of ferromagnets and ferrimagnets are similar, the distinction lies in the source of the net magnetic moments. A ferrimagnetic material is one that has populations of atoms with opposing magnetic moments, as in antiferromagnetism; however, in ferrimagnetic materials, the opposing moments are unequal and a spontaneous magnetization remains. Ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, or antiferromagnetic materials possess permanent magnetization even without external magnetic field and do not have a well defined zero-field susceptibility. Ferrites (widely used in household products such as refrigerator magnets) are usually ferrimagnetic ceramic compounds derived from iron oxides. Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a famous example.

References:
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See above:

Magnetic Properties

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